In a Moment’s Time, the Decisions of Not Signing the DNR, She Was Intubated, and Was Saved

Two cases of the means of intubation here, but with, totally, different outcomes, on life and death, off of the Front Page Sections, translated…

In the times of outbreaks, the severely symptomatic had signed their DNR, but, the outcomes were, not the same, some, at the moment of critical conditions, retracted the signing of the DNR, intubated and recovered.  But there were those patients whom, not knowing what was happening, signed the DNR, but in the advices of other physicians from other hospitals, retracted, and transferred, had the ECMO placed in, and still died.

The woman, Chen in her sixties with diabetes, was confirmed of contraction, sent to a specialty ward for MERS-CoV of a major hospital in Taipei, she wasn’t good, had a serious case of pneumonia, with her blood sugar rising up, and kidney malfunction, her conditions worsened, and the hospitals put her on dialysis.

Chen told, that back then, the medical staff members wanted her to sign the DNR, and stated it clearly, “This is for your own good, also, for the sake of your offspring!”, and so she’d, signed it, and, checked the box of “no intubation in emergency resuscitation”.

But, at the other nurses’ advise, she’d, retracted the consent forms, and this decision seemed to have, saved her life, a few days later, she had respiratory failure, the doctors intubated her, and actively treated her, used the steroids, and she’d turned for the better, and was out of the hospital safely in the end.

the medical staff members intubating a patient! Photo from online

The sixty-two-year-old Mr. Shih didn’t have such good luck, he was confirmed of contraction last May on the thirtieth, was hospitalized at the hospital nearby to his home, within two days of admittance into the hospital, the medical staff members tried actively persuading him to sign the DNR, and he’d trusted the medical professionals’ advice, and signed it.

Mrs. Shih had been confirmed of contraction days earlier, and was treated at a different hospital, as she’d learned of her husband’s signing his DNR, she’d discussed it with friends, of them, one who is a physician advised against it, reason being that her husband isn’t elderly, nor did he have any serious illnesses.  And so, she’d tried hard to persuade her husband to get the DNR retracted.

A couple of days later, Mr. Shih’s conditions took a turn for the worst, his primary treating physician called Mrs. Shih up, “Intubation or not, it’s a hope, it’s quite painful for the patients to be intubated, so many patients who’d been intubated didn’t make it.”

The following day, the physician called again, “if you don’t sign the papers, when the time comes, we will, shock him with the electrodes, and, the CPR we perform on him may break his ribs.”, but Mrs. Shih decided to get her husband intubated.  A couple of days later, the hospital told her that her husband needed around-the-clock medical care, and transferred him to a medical center up north.  But because of the critical condition Mr. Shih was in, they’d put the ECMO in, but the sudden internal bleeding, even as the paramedics did their best, he still passed.

And so, this is on the decisions of life or death, made on a dime, and we are faced with these difficult decisions about our loved ones, especially the elderly family members, and, there’s still no right or wrong way to approach this, and, usually, these moments came too quickly, that we won’t get the time to make that list of pros and cons, and then, decide what we want to do for our, loved ones.

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Filed under "Professional" Opinions, Choices, Do-Not-Resuscitate, Life, On Death & Dying, Properties of Life, the Finality of Life, The Right to Choose How One Will Die

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