The Parents of a One-Year-Old Donated Her Kidneys After She’d Died, Saving Two Young Girls from a Life of, Dialysis

The surgical teams of VMH Taipei held a press conference, that they’d finished the harvesting of a child of a year and three months, only 9.8 kilograms kidneys that took twenty surgeons, eighteen hours, made the record for the youngest and lightest in weight organ donor in the country’s history, and the record of transplanting both kidneys to the recipients.

The young life didn’t get a chance to grow up, but it’d helped the four-year-old young girl, Hsu, and the nine-year-old girl, Hsu to not be tried by the need for dialyses during their lifetimes, and a year after the surgeries, the two young girls came forth, active.

4歲李小妹妹(左二),以及9歲許小妹妹(右二)接受器官捐贈成功,免於終身洗腎。記者蕭羽耘/攝影
the four year-old Lee on the left, and the nine year-old Hsu on the right, who’d successful received the donated kidneys of the one-year-three-months-old infant girl, which saved them from a lifetime of, dialyses…photo courtesy of UDN.com

It’s hard to imagine, how these two young girls had been battling life and death just last year, the infant girl, Lee, three days after her birth, had a ruptured stomach, which caused her to go into shock from the sepsis, causing her kidneys to lose the functions, and she’s at risk of needing dialysis for the rest of her life, she’s the youngest child in the country’s record for needing long-term dialysis in the country; while the other young girl, Hsu, due to her congenital heart condition, which caused her kidney to fail, causing her to develop a progressive kidney disease, had been undergoing dialysis for three years to date.  The head of pediatric department of Taipei V.M.H. Chang stated, that the two children had been undergoing dialysis long-term, and can only maintain the basics of their bodily functions, are both delayed in growth, that kidney transplant was the only way to save their, lives.

“Waiting for a kidney, and transplanting”, it’s another serious trial.  The head pediatric surgeon of Taipei V.M.H., Tsai told, that there are, not enough young recipient of donor kidneys, and the harvesting and implanting surgeries are, especially difficult to perform, and there are the higher risks of complications compared to the adults, with a low success rate; and the children are smaller in size, their body can’t provide the needs of the adult donors’.

Three weeks after the transplant, Hsu the young girl was successfully discharged from the hospitals, but, the other young girl, Lee, due to her frequent blood transfusions, it’d caused her immune system to develop the antigens, and the hospital took various methods of treatment measures, after twelve plasma transfusions, and giving her the medication to help fight off her body’s rejections, finally, a month after the surgeries, she’d gotten off dialysis for good.

The follow up of the transplants continued for a year, the originally 5.8 centimeter large donor kidneys, grew bigger with the recipients, and now, are at 10.5 centimeters, and eight centimeters, and the two young girls are “growing taller in very fast speed”, growing up happily right now, and now they only needed to pick up their medications at the hospitals and taking the meds on time, they’re now, living like, normal children.

And so, this, is the love that’s, left behind, after someone dies, and, these organ transplants for young children are really hard to get, because, most parents aren’t willing, to have their own children who’d died, cut open, and having their usable organs harvested, to give to other young children who are in need, but these organ transplants and organ donations, are the surest, to keep your child who’d died, alive, because they’re not really, actually gone, as their donated organs are, living on, in other children’s bodies, and, so, you’d be, saving, multiple lives, but this would be, a very, difficult decision for the parents of children who’d died, to sign off on.

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Filed under A Cycle of Kindness, Kindness Shown, Life, Philosophies of Life, Properties of Life, Stories of Hope

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