Getting Over Postpartum Depression

How do I get rid of those baby blues??? Translated…

After twenty hours’ WORTH of intensive labor, after I’d gone all out, having my child, I felt completely spent.

And still, while I was trying to catch my breaths, I’m faced with the next task, breastfeeding. The three days I was in the hospital after my child was born, I had been working hard to learn how to breastfeed my child, and how to pump the milk out. And the nurses in the nursery kept reminding me of how I need to breastfeed and to pump often, otherwise, I wouldn’t have enough milk in me.

And, with the four-hours of sporadic rests I’d gotten, I felt exhausted, and I’d cried every single day. I’d hold my child, and he would cry, I’d put him down, he still cried, when I couldn’t breastfeed him right, he’d cry; when he’d cried for no reasons at all, I’d followed his lead too.

In this situation, my husband had fallen into a deeper state of depression than I had. He’d watched me getting spent all day long by the baby, felt that he was being neglected, although he would take care of my needs, but within the third sentence of our conversations, we’d start to spat again, “I’d gained a child but lost a wife, you no longer treat me like you used to anymore!”, and hearing him say that, it made me feel even MORE helpless.

Thankfully, there are people at the nursing center who are professionals in taking care of me and my child, and all the ladies that brought the meals and picked up after me were extremely kind to me, they’d told me jokes, and how they had gone through the child-rearing processes, reminded me to go to the Yoga course, offered by the nursing center, to get to know other mothers, to exchange our experiences on how to take care of the children. When my friends came to visit me, they’d give me courage to face my own child.

The first month after I’d returned home from the afterbirth center, I was still unconfident about breastfeeding, I’d made a TON of “S.O.S. calls” back to the center, and they were very patient in explaining what to do. Later when I’d gone back to the hospital to get my follow-up, I met a senior nurse in the nursery, turns out she remembered me, asked me how I had been, and told me that if I didn’t have enough milk, what kind of things I should do, this made me extremely grateful.

The time flies, and I can now, face my child on my own, and my husband’s “postpartum depression” had also subsided.

And now, my child is already one, and I’d gotten a firsthand experience of the joys of motherhood. Thinking back to that period of my life, I still feel extremely lucky, because had I not had the supports of all of those people, my husband and I would’ve had more difficulties facing the birth of my son.

So, postpartum depression is NOT a myth then? And the reason W-H-Y we women may have postpartum depression would be because??? Oh yeah, it’s that H-O-R-M-O-N-E “thing” again, and think what we would face, I mean, the kid was inside of us, relying on us for her/his survival, and now, all of a sudden, s/he came out, and can breathe on her/his own, and we’d feel loss, because our kid had “separated” from us, and that, is only the beginning, and, many of us still have to deal with our separate high competitive occupations AFTER we gave birth, and we still have to keep our husbands’ (1 @ a time) DICKS in check, are you kidding me?

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Filed under Being Alone, Expectations, Postpartum Depression/Postpartum Psychosis & Other Problems from After Birth, Wake Up Calls, White Picket Fence

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